This is interesting: A fraud-detection company built on Google’s Prediction API

Add your t“With FDaaS, suspicious claims are proactively flagged by the system, which alerts IWD employees about potentially fraudulent claims. The claims are plotted on a heatmap built on Google Maps to identify areas with the highest fraud incidents and determine where to put more investigative resources. We also use Google Street View to check the validity of businesses that submit claims.”

Gigaom

If you thought Google’s Prediction API was just a handy tool for web programmers and weekend hackers, think again. A Folsom, Calif.-based startup called Pondera Solutions is pushing what it calls Fraud Detection as a Service, which is based on a variety of Google (s goog) services, including the Prediction API machine learning tool.

Pondera has actually been offering its service since November 2011, but this is the first I’ve heard of it. I spotted it in a Wednesday-morning Google Enterprise blog post announcing that the Iowa Workforce Development agency has selected Pondera to power its unemployment-fraud detection efforts. The agency’s system for analyzing unemployment claims highlights a portion of the Google services Pondera uses:

“With FDaaS, suspicious claims are proactively flagged by the system, which alerts IWD employees about potentially fraudulent claims. The claims are plotted on a heatmap built on Google Maps to identify areas with the highest…

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Create Precise Buyer Personas With SEO Data: A 10-Step Guide

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If your content fails to resonate with a target audience, your buyer personas might be to blame. Content often fails because it’s built on a weak foundation of faulty personas that were based on a …

Carla Gentry CSPO‘s insight:

Google’s Data-Trove DanceInternal Debates Arise Over Using Collected Information and Protecting Privacy

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The Power of Glamour and the Upsell of Dreams

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For years, marketers, advertisers and brands have been selling dreams to build on the hopes of consumers. But are we really building on these dreams?

Carla Gentry CSPO‘s insight:

In her piece, Postrel talks about martial glamour – or how war seemed glamourous to those that would follow in their leader’s footsteps. She talks about Achilles from ancient Greece, but you could also look to the poem The Charge of the Light Brigade, by Alfred Tennyson, to see how war was glamourized

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Utilities Behind the Big Data Curve – Agile Data Warehousing

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Agile Data Warehousing, an independent media site dedicated to all things Agile Data

Carla Gentry CSPO‘s insight:

That shortage is one reason the industry is falling short when it comes to putting the data it collects to better use. Compounding the problem is that most utilities still take a siloed approach to their data, according to Guerry Waters, vice president for industry strategy at Oracle Utilities. “The utility industry needs to take an enterprise view of the data,” he says. “If they stopped thinking about who owns what piece of it and pooled all the data they have, the potential is there to extract very useful information about the customer.”

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At Netflix, big data can affect even the littlest things

The success of a show like Orange isn’t entirely because of data, of course — it still has to be well written and acted, and the show is based on a memoir rather than the result of an algorithm that creates TV concepts — but the data definitely helps Netflix figure out what viewers want to watch and how they want it presented. As more television is delivered digitally, the industry itself almost has to become more like the web, where visitor behavior is analyzed ad nauseum and data helps inform even seemingly trivial changes in page layout or user experience. Content is king, but every little thing matters when it’s coming at your users from every direction.

Gigaom

You weren’t alone. You fired up your Netflix (s nflx) device a couple Fridays ago, happened across Orange is the New Black in your Netflix recommendations, started watching the first episode and then wondered why you’d never heard of it. Netflix’s other original programming — House of Cards and Arrested Development — received huge preavailability marketing, and they weren’t even this good.

The answer to your question, like the answer to so many other questions these days, is data. Netflix didn’t have to spend millions of dollars advertising the new show hoping you would tune in — it knew you’d see it in the recommendations, it knew you’d give it a try and it knew you’d like it. According to the company during its earnings call on Monday, “Orange is the New Black” actually had more viewers watching more hours than during its first week than its predecessors had.

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New Market Research – Still A Ways to Go?

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Are we – myself included – kidding ourselves that Market Researchers are on a positive trajectory to becoming Insights Consultants? Or is “New MR” more necessary than ever?

Carla Gentry CSPO‘s insight:

The responsibility for overly long, tedious questionnaires has to lie with the MR clients who pay for them; from Ray’s evidence, there are enough MR client-side researchers that still have internal stakeholders and Budget owners who value the data output.

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Transforming Big Data into Smart Data: Deriving Value via harnessin…

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Amit Sheth, “Transforming Big Data into Smart Data: Deriving Value via harnessing Volume, Variety and Velocity using semantics and Semantic Web,” keynote at the

Carla Gentry CSPO‘s insight:

Highlight: How to harness Smart Data that is actionable, from the Voluminous Big Data with Velocity and Variety– using Semantics and the Semantic Web core to bring Human-Centric Computing in practice.

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Big Data Observations: The Science of Asking Questions

“I suspect, however, like as it is happening in many academic fields, the NSA is sorely tempted by all the data at its fingertips and is adjusting its methods to the data rather than to its research questions. That’s called looking for your keys under the light”—

What's The Big Data?

Charles_Darwin_Standing“I am a firm believer that without speculation there is no good and original observation”—Charles Darwin

“It is the theory that determines what we can observe”—Albert Einstein

“I suspect, however, like as it is happening in many academic fields, the NSA is sorely tempted by all the data at its fingertips and is adjusting its methods to the data rather than to its research questions. That’s called looking for your keys under the light”—Zeynep Tufekci

“Large open-access data sets offer unprecedented opportunities for scientific discovery—the current global collapse of bee and frog populations are classic examples. However, we must resist the temptation to do science backwards by posing questions after, rather than before, data analysis. A scant understanding of the context in which data sets were collected can lead to poorly framed questions and results, and to conclusions that are plain wrong. Scientists intending to make use of large…

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Population is Not Just Numbers, It’s About People – The International Year of Statistics (Statistics2013)

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By the United Nations Statistics Division Census Team The world’s population currently stands at 7 billion and, according to the United Nations World Population Prospects 2012 Revision, is expected to grow to 8 billion in the next 12 years.

Carla Gentry CSPO‘s insight:

The case for adequate quality population statistics has, therefore, never been stronger. At all levels of society – national, regional and international – there is a convergence of interest in population matters as governments and agencies want to know not just the numbers but also the human capital of their populations. Consequently, population is not just numbers, but about people and their socio-economic characteristics in terms of where they live, their education level, participation in the labour force, fertility and mortality levels, migration trends, living arrangements, living conditions, etc.

 

 

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This data worth mining | Boston Herald

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Economic news is often hard to understand, but this nugget is a mystery that will occupy economists, sociologists and activists of all kinds for a

Carla Gentry CSPO‘s insight:

Causes and ramifications have to be teased out of all the correlations. According to the account of the research in The New York Times, upward mobility goes with dispersal of poor families, more two-parent families, good schools and high participation in civic groups — all unsurprising. – See more at: http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/opinion/editorials/2013/07/this_data_worth_mining#sthash.REy4swtt.dpuf

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