[Infographic]: The Future Of Online Backup – Tools Journal

[Infographic]: The Future Of Online Backup

Source: www.toolsjournal.com

With technological advancements, various devices and concepts like smartphones, tablets and recently Internet Of Things; huge data growth is being witnessed (photos, music, docs…). Obviously there a growth in data risk as well. To overcome this regular backup needs to be taken. Now online backup is available with its own set of merits and demerits.

Google aiming to collect healthcare data in the future and save 100,000 lives: But what about your privacy?

Google wants to collect your healthcare data to save 100,000 lives and more each year, but are you willing to give up your privacy to make this a distinct possibility?

Source: www.techtimes.com

Privacy is the main concern here, and it is not certain how many people are willing to give that up in favor of saving 100,000 lives per year.

Solving the Mystery of Hadoop Reliability

Anyone who uses Hadoop on a regular basis knows that reliability of complex jobs is a mystery. The odds of a Hadoop job running according to plan every time are not 90 percent, or even 80 percent at most shops. Some Hadoop teams have turned this resignation into a sense of pride at their skill in managing the weaknesses of Hadoop. The question that interests me is: Why is this okay?

Source: www.forbes.com

Anyone who uses Hadoop on a regular basis knows that reliability of complex jobs is a mystery. The odds of a Hadoop job running according to plan every time are not 90 percent, or even 80 percent at most shops. Some Hadoop teams have turned this resignation into a sense of pride at their skill in managing the weaknesses of Hadoop. The question that interests me is: Why is this okay?

Society’s demand for ‘big data’ creating shortage of skilled workers

By Guest Columnist JENNIFER PRIESTLEY, professor of applied statistics and data science, and director of the Center for Statistics and Analytical Services, at Kennesaw State University

Big Data …

Source: saportareport.com

A salary study recently completed by executive recruiter Linda Burtch found that data scientists now command higher salaries than doctors or lawyers. Early career data scientists’ median starting salary was $140,000, with more senior data scientists earning a median salary of more than $230,000. By contrast, the average annual income for a lawyer in the United States was $131,990 in 2013, while doctors earned on average $183,940. – See more at: http://saportareport.com/blog/2014/06/societys-demand-for-big-data-creating-shortage-of-skilled-workers/#sthash.o1msQ5Hg.dpuf

How Many Data Scientists are out there? | SYS-CON MEDIA

SYS-CON Media, NJ, The world’s leading i-technology media company on breaking technology news.

Source: www.sys-con.com

A quick examination of the top 10 ranked Kagglers shows that only one has a title of “Data Scientist”. Top 10 include neuroscience researchers, PhD mathematicians and physicists, and while they are clearly talented competitors on Kaggle, their actual job may not involve data science.

The Best Infographics of 2014 (So Far)

Here are 11 brands that totally nailed their infographics in the first half of 2014.

Source: blog.hubspot.com

The best infographics are clear, easy-to-follow, contain useful information, and have colors that go well together. Here are 11 brands from all different industries — from real estate companies toparalegal programs — that totally nailed their infographics this year so far. So scroll on and get inspired! 

Skill sets today’s data scientists need to succeed

Source: siliconangle.com

A data scientist is described in many ways. According to Josh Wills, Senior Director of Data Science at Cloudera, it’s a “person who is better at statistics than any software engineer and better at software engineering than any statistician,” he wrote in a May 3, 2012 tweet@josh_wills. Also, data scientists must know math, statistics, experiments, causal inference, machine learning, and software, according to a blog post by data scientist Trey Causey.

We are not ready for health data mining

Mind you, there are laws that prevent employers from looking into HIPAA-protected health data, but not Acxiom data, which is entirely unregulated. And if we “opened up all the data” then the laws would be entirely moot. It would be a world where, to get a job, the employer got to see everything about you, including your future health profile. To some extent this is already happening.

mathbabe

There have been two articles very recently about how great health data mining could be if we could only link up all the data sets. Larry Page from Google thinks so, which doesn’t surprise anyone, and separately we are seeing that the consequence of the new medical payment system through the ACA is giving medical systems incentives to keep tabs on you through data providers and find out if you’re smoking or if you need to fill up on asthma medication.

And although many would consider this creepy stalking, that’s not actually my problem with it. I think Larry Page is right – we might be able to save lots of lives if we could mine this data which is currently siloed through various privacy laws. On the other hand, there are reasons those privacy laws exist. Let’s think about that for a second.

Now that we have the ACA, insurers are not…

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License plate datamining may be the next privacy battle for courts

In what privacy advocates hailed as a landmark decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police must obtain a warrant to search cell phones belongin

Source: www.examiner.com

Automatic License Plate Recognition (ALPR) systems are the newrage in law enforcement worldwide. Cameras – affixed to a police car or static locations like light poles, or under bridges – capture thousands of license plates per minute, storing information in databases, recording not only the license plate number, but also the GPS location where each car was "pinged." Tens of millions of federal grant dollars have been doled out to police agencies nationwide for ALPR procurement, setting the groundwork for an expansive, nationwide motor vehicle tracking system.

UC Berkeley Breeds Data Scientists Online: $60K, 18 Months – InformationWeek

Want a data science Master’s degree? UC Berkeley’s $60,000 online program will make a data scientist out of you in 18 months.

Source: www.informationweek.com

"Since it’s a data science degree, the kind of people we’re going to appeal to may be more comfortable than the average person with doing a Master’s degree online," says Weber. "Many [students] are working professionals, so we can offer this degree in a flexible way, and they can take their classes in the late afternoons or evenings."