Ag data: its value, who owns it and where’s it going? | Cotton content from Southeast Farm Press

Big data, Griffin said, is defined differently by different groups. For him, big data is data too big to be handled within Excel, the common numbers-crunching spreadsheet software. “It’s kind of like the ol’ adage of ‘trying to drink water from a fire hose;’ Imagine that kind of data coming through; it’s hard to capture it all,” said Griffin, who was raised in Arkansas and received a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Purdue University “But big-data systems do capture all that data.”

Source: southeastfarmpress.com

Where does big data come from? Issues of big data, information privacy and agriculture are not new, he said, and have been around since the mid-1990s when GPS technology opened to the public and started its mass adoption across agriculture. This is when tractor cabs, implements and smart phones began communicating with satellites for precision use.

 

Precision ag technology, for example, creates monster-sized data, which can include field-specific information on planting, preseason and in-season crop-input choices and investment, management strategies and harvesting practices. Data by itself standing in a vacuum has no value, but once information is gleaned from the data, it then becomes valuable. Companies can use the information to give growers “field prescriptions,” which are valuable to a grower who can focus inputs for optimal yields on a per-field basis

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Complex Data Analytics, Put Simply

Why data is getting more complicated

Using a data management platform to look after names, phone numbers and address information isn’t good enough anymore – we need to be able to bring additional analytical layers to bear upon our data including:

Source: www.forbes.com

Sentiment analysis – data management platforms are being constructed with built in libraries (in different human languages) that can detect sentiment i.e. I can Tweet that I hate a particular hamburger chain, but if I Tweet that “I wish Five Guys had more A1 sauce” then I am expressing a hope and a specific product-related desire – and at an aggregated level if many users say the same kind of thing, then this starts to matter.

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The internet of things isn’t producing a data deluge … yet

Data Science is Real! – See Carla Gentry’s Data Science is Real site. Met and interacted at a recent conference. … http://ow.ly/2Q2u7q

Gigaom

There are already billions of devices — from forks to jet engines — connected to the internet, and all signs point to a huge surge in the coming years. Cisco, for example, predicts 21 billion of them in 2018, up from 13 billion in 2013. But despite those numbers, the companies that will be storing all that device data are less concerned sheer volume and more concerned about making it usable.

On the Amazon Web Services cloud, where anecdotal evidence suggests a large percentage IoT applications run, all that connected data is just a drop in an enormous bucket. Matt Wood, the company’s general manager of data science, said the world of big data has matured so much over the past few years that, for example, customers regularly spin up thousands of cores to process large datasets. It’s not yet commonplace, but common enough, that “we get blasé talking about petabytes and tens of thousands of…

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Claims and Complaints Management – Rivo

Single source of truth claims handling

For all claims and complaints in a single software solution accessible by all employees and third parties anywhere in the world
Reduce costs of administration overheads
Reduce risk and remove duplication of information

Source: www.rivosoftware.com

One of the UK’s top visitor attractions with nearly 5 million visitors in 2011, the Natural History Museum is home to life and earth science specimens comprising some 70 million items within its five main collections. NHM implemented a multi-functional Rivo solution that provides Claims and Complaints Management capability gave giving the museum the ability to manage all aspects of incidents; from which, given the volume of public admissions they face on an annual basis, there is tremendous scope for significant legal claims. Since implementing Rivo Claims and Complaints Management functionality, the museum has seen a reduction in time spent defending claims and also for the associated costs around claims and complaints management.

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Analysis: How is supply chain security affected by world events?

How will recent world events such as the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and sanctions on Russia effect the security of global supply chains?

Source: www.retail-week.com

Still think sustainability and security are NOT important?

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The Internet of Things Market to Reach $3.04 Trillion

Together, the IoT ecosystem represents boundless opportunities — billions of connected things within a wide variety of industries across the globe. The combined revenue opportunities are forecast to be one of the bright spots on the new Internet-related technology frontier.

A recent forecast from International Data Corporation (IDC), based upon an extensive global market study, provides insights from their latest findings — defining the hardware, software, services, connectivity, and security aspects that make up the evolving IoT ecosystem.

Source: www.socialmediatoday.com

According to the IDC assessment, the worldwide IoT market is forecast to grow from $1.3 trillion in 2013 to $3.04 trillion in 2020, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 13 percent.

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How Will Big Data Make You Feel — Happy and Healthy or Bitter and Bothered?

TechCrunch reported last week on a startup named Breezometer that is compiling air pollution data to give people a sense of what the air quality is like in their neighborhood. It takes freely available pollution data gathered by government agencies and aggregates it with location information and displays it in an app. As someone with occasionally troubled lungs, I love this idea.

At Re/Code last week, the co-chairs of the Future of Privacy Forum cited examples of how government agencies were using big data “in the fight against discrimination and hate” by looking at everything from housing, minority health care, school suspensions, and police behavior

Source: www.forbes.com

On an equally serious note, Daniel Heimpel, publisher of The Chronicle Of Social Change, wrote recently on the topic of preventive analytics and child protection. In a detailed and insightful article, he talked about a new paradigm emerging “where big data can be crunched in a way that helps determine which children are at greater risk of being abused,” based on family history, education, economic level, and other factors. As one source noted, “[T]his information can be used for a range of activities – as a ‘check’ for clinical decision-making, to assign more experienced workers to more serious cases, to prioritize families for limited services slots, or to take some other action.”

I’m less happy to report that, on the other side of the spectrum, some people are using big data to engender feelings ranging from bother to bitterness.

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The Little Word Behind Big Data In HR

While some multinational corporations (MNCs) have HR analytics capabilities within a global head office, local HR professionals are stymied by their inability to tap into this information for local, timely planning and decision-making. Important employee information can live in a million different places – enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, HR information systems, payroll and talent management systems, you name it. Some data are even still held in spreadsheets.

Source: www.forbes.com

Just finding the data can be a challenge, let alone integrating it and running sophisticated business-focused queries on it.

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Economena Analytics: Big data at your fingertips

Competition-wise, while their business overlaps with others, no professional data provider is operating in the same space. “I think our biggest competitor is Google,” says Akiki with a laugh, “because it makes people think that they can get whatever they want pretty easily.”

Source: www.executive-magazine.com

The Middle East is not known for its availability of information, but Akiki is hoping that once they become trusted professional information service providers, there will be more willingness from different sources to share their information. Currently, 95 percent of their data is publicly available information — from official sources such as ministries and private associations

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Using Big Data To Fight Pandemics

People’s efforts have understandably been focused elsewhere. This week at the ITU Plenipotentiary Conference in Busan, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the GSMA and the Internet Society (ISOC) announced that they are joining forces in the fight against Ebola. This unity is an essential step forward, but along with the GSMA, United Nations Global Pulse, and a number of other data scientists, I really want to make sure we, and most importantly the African mobile operators, address this opportunity and truly harness the potential of the data available.

Source: techcrunch.com

Of course mobile data analytics cannot directly assist the heroic work of doctors and nurses who are on the ground, but it could prove extremely helpful when it comes to planning resource allocation or understanding the effectiveness of different mobility containment measures.

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